Wireworm Research Group

The Wireworm Research Group (WRG) was formed as a collaborative effort between research scientists, industry and growers to set research priorities that will address the pressing need for new IPM tools to manage wireworms in croplands. There is currently a deficit in knowledge of their basic distribution and biology in field crops. The WRG met during the national entomology meeting held in Knoxville Tennessee, November 13 2012.

U.S. Researchers

Dr. Kevin Wanner

Dr. Kevin Wanner
Assistant Professor of Entomology and Extension Specialist for Cropland Entomology
Montana State University,
Bozeman, Montana, USA

Kevin Wanner is an assistant Professor of Entomology in the Department of Plant Sciences and Plant Pathology and he is the Extension Specialist for Cropland Entomology in Montana. His research includes the molecular genetic mechanisms of insect olfaction and the applications of molecular biology to Integrated Pest Management. His applied field research focuses on providing growers with science-based recommendations to manage wireworms.

Dr. Mike Ivie

Dr. Mike Ivie
Associate Professor and Curator of Entomology
Montana State University,
Bozeman, Montana, USA

Michael Ivie is an Associate Professor in the Department of Plant Sciences and Plant Pathology and curator of the Montana Entomology Collection at Montana State University. His research is centered on understanding the evolution and systematics of numerous beetle families, including click beetles (Elateridae). His approach involves studies of biodiversity at the level of the lineage and the fauna. His continuing faunistic work encompasses 30 years of work on the beetles of the West Indies and Northern Rocky Mountains.

Dr. Paul Johnson

Dr. Paul Johnson
Professor of Entomology
South Dakota State University
Brookings, South Dakota, USA

Paul Johson is an entomology professor at South Dakota State University, with research interests that revolve around insect biological diversity and natural history, and special emphasis on systematics, community ecology, and biogeography. His current research is focused on faunal and taxonomic studies of click beetles (Elateridae) and several other beetle families.

 Dr. Jocelyn Millar

Dr. Jocelyn Millar
Professor of Entomology
University of California
Riverside, California, USA

Jocelyn Millar is a Professor of Entomology at the University of California, Riverside. He is trained as an organic chemist, with a focus on insect semiochemistry and chemical ecology. He is both a field biologist and a laboratory chemist, with expertise at finding and synthesizing insect-produced chemicals such as sex or aggregation pheromones, as well as plant-produced chemicals including those that insects use to locate and recognize their preferred feeding and egg-laying sites.

Dr. Erik Wenninger

Dr. Erik Wenninger
Assistant Professor
University of Idaho
Kimberly, Idaho, USA

Erik Wenninger is an Assistant Professor of entomology with the University of Idaho’s Kimberly Research and Extension Center. He conducts research on the biology, ecology, and behavior of insect pests and their natural enemies in order to develop economically and environmentally sound management strategies. Specific interests include applied behavioral and chemical ecology, mating behavior, plant-insect interactions, and biological control. His commodity focus includes potatoes, forage alfalfa, sugar beets, and other field crops.

Dr. Arash Rashed

Dr. Arash Rashed
Assistant Professor
University of Idaho
Aberdeen, Idaho, USA

Arash Rashed is an Assistant Professor of entomology and cropland entomologist with the Aberdeen Research and Extension Center at the University of Idaho. He specializes in cereals, with long-term projects involving barley yellow dwarf virus, barley mealybug, sawfly, and, more recently, wireworms.

Dr. David Crowder

Dr. David Crowder
Assistant Professor
Washington State University
Pullman, Washington, USA

David Crowder is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Entomology at Washington State University. His research seeks to understand how farming systems, land-use and environmental change impact insect communities and plant-insect interactions. Most of his research is conducted in agricultural ecosystems, at the interface of basic and applied science. His research helps guide efforts to promote sustainability in agricultural systems, and provide fundamental insight into the processes affecting the structure and function of insect communities.

Dr. Silvia Rondon

Dr. Silvia Rondon
Associate Professor
Oregon State University
Hermiston, Oregon, USA

Silvia Rondon is an Associate Professor and extension entomologist at the Hermiston Agricultural Research and Extension Center at Oregon State University. She researches the development of cost-effective integrated pest management (IPM) practices for irrigated crops, including small grains, potatoes, onions, and corn. She specializes in biological control, insect biology, and ecology for both field and greenhouse production.

International Researchers

Dr. Robert Vernon

Dr. Robert Vernon
Research Scientist,
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada
Agassiz, British Columbia, Canada

For the last two decades Dr. Vernon has researched wireworms infesting field crops in Canada and the Pacific Northwest, publishing more than thirty articles on the subject. His wireworm research has focused on many of the components of integrated pest management (IPM), including trapping and monitoring, survey and identification and control methods.

Dr. Wim van Herk

Dr. Wim van Herk
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada
Agassiz, British Columbia, Canada

Wim van Herk is an entomologist at the Pacific Agri-Food Research Centre of Agassiz, British Columbia, Canada. He has co-authored nearly a dozen peer-reviewed journal articles on wireworm life history, diversity, pest status, and response to pest control stratagems.